Wednesday, September 26, 2012

There May Be An Upside

Can we use WASP venom to spur on and activate certain proteins, which are found in the human brain to increase cell growth, brain capacity and neuron transmissions? The reason I ask is that every poison to man seems to stimulate a reaction to fight it. And the old adage “That which does not kill us makes us stronger”. Here is some interesting thoughts on the actual known and studied effects and conclusions.

Now then is such a difference. We know that the venom in WASPS is substantial. And we know that there are about 10,000 known chemicals in the brain. 2000 very prevalent and 200 or more acting in significant amounts during normal brain activity operations. Now then if these chemicals are increased in the brain they will change the current thought. I as most of us can attest that venom from a Bee or Wasp when injected increases adrenaline and increase heart rate. But what else does this do to the human. We know that this poison effects the central nervous system and therefore does act upon the brain since it is connected to the central nervous system. But what if it is exactly injected into the scalp or that part of the body where blood flows interact with the brain. What if we inject it into the brain directly? What is the Genome of the venom? Scientists have mapped out the WASP, Mosquito, Bee, Fly and those things associated with such virus or disease vectors. For instance Malaria, which kills a child every 30 seconds and about a million a year in Sub-Sahara Africa. But the ability to make venom and what it is made of and what travels within it is of significant value in creating anti-viruses, antidotes, etc. One Witch Potion, without going into witch doctor propaganda, Harry Potter Best Selling Books or hocus Pocus, it has been discussed through the ages in many cultures throughout recorded history. So then what good can this provide, what does it do to the human brain and why is it many Bee Keepers seems to be better observers and thinkers than other folks? HMMM? This is an interesting post. Yes it is and there seems to be something to this. People who are allergic to bee stings can die. Those that are not obviously have a defense mechanism and immune system, which jumps into action. But few are without some reaction.
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Well before you get all excited about what this venom is made of, they have figured it out.

Turns out it has some ten amino acids in it amongst other things such a proteins. This when shot into a human even at such small amounts is not without an effect. Is it good or bad. Well it maybe good in some regards and it certainly forces the body to defend itself and therefore triggers the manufacture and discharge of a whole other set of naturally made proteins in the body. We know from the relationships between mankind and other species that throughout the last 160,000 years and as many as 1 million years we have in some form or another been living together. Everything affects everything else.

Those, which are allergic to bees are rarely allergic to wasps. And vice versa. The Wasp has certain proteins, which do not exist in bee stings. There maybe a correlation to the natural brain stimulants found in the protein PWS 120MCG/V, or that protein triggers the body to counteract the venom and forces a defense system which increases brain activity or changes the areas of the brain which are used in certain ways and for certain things. It is an observation that people who live in areas where wasps live have a percentage of intellectuals coming out of those regions who do not have the benefits of good schools, proper nurturing or balanced diet or high in protein foods which are prevalent.
What is also of interest is during hotter summers we will see a higher degree of these species in North America. And as well, more mosquitoes on other similar genome insects as well as the Killer bees we saw climb into Northern Climates during the last decade. As climates change and cycles come forth, we may find ourselves needing to study these things more and learn how to adapt and create symbiotic relationships with these insects as we attempt to share the country with them. These invaders have different niches but some which coincide and collide with mankind. We need be sure we know which is which. For instance the West Nile Virus is a real problem with animals and livestock. These are sources of our artificial food chain to sustain life as we know it.
We need to know how each creature works and its place in our lives and eco-system so that we can live accordingly and harvest the important things for ourselves. For instance if Wasps eat Mosquitoes and we can harvest the venom then we can have the best of all worlds for us. If Wasps feed on certain types of Mosquitoes such as the common house Mosquito, Culex pipiens, which sucks the blood from birds and occasionally humans, also known to spread West Nile Virus then the global heating will bring in the Wasps and they will take care of the Mosquito populations. The venom if it stings people would not transfer and the Wasps have adapted not be affected by the disease itself. Problems being that Wasps are territorial and might sting people and they just keep stinging and can cause issues such as the ones stated in the previous listed websites above. Now then if we are to really go after these mosquitoes we might have artificial robot or scare crow dummies like humans, which give off a scent or odor that the mosquitoes pick up on and then the flesh like surface would contain underneath acetone or Wasp venom proteins underneath killing the mosquito. Every member of the food chain appears to have an enemy and the giant Mosquitoes with the once inch wing span eat, the other mosquitoes but cannot sting humans, thus they too are positive contributions to the food chain which keeps the biting mosquitoes away. The protein in Wasp Venom is an interesting one and we need to study it more. The Wasp is also used to eat aphids in many places where they are sensitive to the use of insecticides or that the level of potency of insecticide to kill them is too much since the aphids, mosquitoes and other insects have grown accustomed to the insecticides and are resistant now. These are all real issues in modern farming.
There are many types of Mosquitoes about 80, which harm man or carry diseases. We know of as many types of WASPS, some of which like to eat aphids and certain smaller insects like the common house mosquito, which has killed hundreds and seems to be killing more each year with West Nile Virus, which is not very funny. Now then we also have a bark beetle problem so if we can find a genome which likes to eat sand flies for the beach goers and surfers and kite surfers, likes to eat aphids for the farmers, Culex type mosquitoes for the West Nile Situation and Bark Beetles for the forests we are good to go. Meanwhile scientists are trying to decide how to genetically modify organisms such as mosquitoes so they will not carry West Nile virus. If they do that Malaria, Yellow Fever and a host of other terrible problems maybe only one more step away. Think about it.

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Our Health Report Card

Today in the United States we spend over one and a half trillion dollars a year on health care.
That represents the highest spending per person in the world. With that entire investment
one would think that Americans are the healthiest people in the world. And yet a recent
report from the World Health Organization ranked the United States 37th in overall health.
This certainly does not earn the United States an "A." If you factor in the spending, it would
even seem like we get an "F" in our state of health.
So with all this talk about health, the question is what is health?
The World Health Organization has defined an internationally recognized definition of health.
According to the World Health Organization, "health is a state of complete physical, mental
and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."
So let's break this down.
Physical well-being is what the body lives through, enjoys and desires, as well as the agreement
with which the body interacts with the environment.
Mental well-being is what a person thinks and the processes carried out by the brain. This also
includes a spiritual balance for a state of mental harmony.
Social well-being is the harmony with which the body lives among other people and other life.
When all of these elements are in balance, a person is then considered healthy. With these
factors as a measure, is it then so surprising that so many are considered to be unhealthy?
Physical health is not the apparent absence of illness. Most chronic diseases do not, come
on suddenly. They grow through our body over time until finally the effects are severe enough
to show symptoms. It is only the appearance of symptoms that may come on suddenly. So the
absence of symptoms simply means the absence of symptoms.
In the US we have many dedicated health care professionals committing miracles in trauma care
every day. For that the US most certainly gets an A, but with the definition of health provided
by the World Health Organization, it is clear that the responsibility for health does lie with the
doctor. It is our responsibility to focus on creating a balance in the factors of health. First for
ourselves and then for others.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Ideal Choelsterol Reading

Cholesterol is a substance that is present in the human body, and is both good and bad for us. High levels of cholesterol, especially LDL or bad cholesterol can put you at an increased risk for heart diseases and strokes. Similarly, low levels of HDL or good cholesterol, can also increase your risk substantially. But what are high and low levels of cholesterol? Here's a view of ideal cholesterol readings.
Total Cholesterol
According to the total cholesterol in your body, you may have normal levels or increased levels of cholesterol.
Under 200mg/DL: This is the most desirable level of cholesterol to have. If you have cholesterol lower than 200 milligrams per deciliter of blood, then you are considered to have the optimum and normal levels of cholesterol.
Between 200 and 239mg/DL: People within this range of total body cholesterol fall into the category of borderline high risk for getting heart diseases or stroke.
240mg/DL and above: If your total body cholesterol is 240mg/DL or more, then you are at very high risk for contracting heart ailments.
Normal Levels Of HDL Cholesterol
The normal levels of HDL cholesterol are 50-60 mg/DL for women, and 40-50mg/DL for men. HDL is the good cholesterol, and levels lower than 40mg/DL can increase your risk of heart diseases.
Normal Levels Of LDL Cholesterol
Here is a chart, which will show you the optimum, normal, and high levels of LDL cholesterol.
Levels Of LDL Cholesterol     Diagnosis

Below 100mg/DL                Optimum levels

Between 100 and 129mg/DL      Normal levels

Between 130 and 159mg/DL      Borderline Risk

Between 160 and 189mg/DL      High Risk

More Than 190mg/DL            Very High Risk
Note that these readings are guidelines and are considered as part of your overall profile when a doctor makes an assessment of your ideal cholesterol readings. Some people may read high compared to others and yet be found to not be at risk. This is because cholesterol is also made naturally by the body and some people may simply have higher levels than others. However, by understanding the ideal cholesterol reading ranges and by making healthy lifestyle choices, you should be able to achieve your own ideal cholesterol levels, naturally.